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    University of North Carolina Wilmington
   
 
  Sep 24, 2017
 
 
    
2015-2016 Undergraduate Catalogue Archived Catalogue

Addendum to 2015-2016 Undergraduate Catalogue


 


Click on the catalogue sections listed below to view the changes that have occurred in those sections.

  University Calendar University Regulations  
  Administrative Officers Degree Requirements  
  The University Watson College of Education  
  Equal Opportunity, Diversity, and Unlawful Harassment University Studies Program  
  Expenses Courses  
  Scholarships and Financial Aid Faculty  

University Studies Program

Catalogue change 9/23/16:

Thematic Transdisciplinary Clusters:
This catalogue has been amended per a 2016 UNCW Faculty Senate decision to retroactively remove the Thematic Transdisciplinary Cluster requirement from the University Studies program. Students who wish to complete a cluster may do so, however, completion of a cluster is no longer required.

University Calendar

Catalogue correction 5/19/16:

Fall 2016

August 26, Thursday Friday

Late Registration Fee for Reinstatement

Catalogue correction 4/5/16:

Summer 2016

(UNCW has launched an initiative to redesign its summer term.
The Summer 2016 calendar is TENTATIVE).

Summer 2017

(UNCW has launched an initiative to redesign its summer term.
The Summer 2016 calendar is TENTATIVE).

Summer 2018

(UNCW has launched an initiative to redesign its summer term.
The Summer 2016 calendar is TENTATIVE).

Catalogue correction 11/12/15:

Spring, 2016

January 1, Friday New Year’s Day, University closed
April 14,Thursday,  April 12, Tuesday Spring Faculty meeting

Fall 2016

December 23-31, Wednesday-Thursday  December 24-31 Thursday-Thursday University closed 
September 8Thursday,  September 6, Tuesday Fall Faculty meeting

Catalogue correction 3/21/16:

August 11-12, Thursday-Friday   August 10-11, Wednesday-Thursday Transfer orientation and advising
November 11, Friday   October 14, Friday Graduation Application Deadline – Spring 2017  Fall 2016 – undergraduate students

Spring 2017

April 11, Tuesday  March 3, Friday Graduation Application Deadline – Summer 2017 and Fall 2017  Spring 2017– undergraduate students

Summer 2017

Added to calendar:

June 23, Friday Graduation Application Deadline – Summer 2017 – undergraduate students

Administrative Officers

Catalogue Updated 12/14/15:

Academic Affairs:
Raymond L. Burt, Ph.D. — Interim Assistant Provost for International Programs Michael B. Wilhelm, M.A., Associate Vice Chancellor for International Programs

Catalogue change 8/18/15:

Student Affairs:

Andrea J. Dorow, M.S. Christina Logan — Interim Director of Transition Programs

Jennie R. McNeilly, M.A. – Senior Associate Dean of Students

Catalogue change 10/20/2015: 

Jose V. Sartarelli, Ph.D. Chancellor

Bradley Ballou, M.P.S. — Chief of Staff
Mark W. Lanier, M.A. — Assistant to the Chancellor and Assistant Secretary, Board of Trustees
Stefanie Powell, B.B.A., C.P.A., C.I.S.A. — Chief Audit Executive
Vacant — Assistant to the Chancellor for Community Partnerships
Jimmy F. Bass, M.S.A. — Assistant to the Chancellor and Director of Athletics
W. Kent Guion, M. D. Chief Diversity Officer
John P. Scherer II, J. D. Associate General Counsel

Updates for Board of Trustees:

University of North Carolina Wilmington
Board of Trustees

Michael B. Shivar, Chair
Wilma W. Daniels, Vice Chair
Yvonne Gidget Kidd, Secretary

Class of 2017

Class of 2019

Dennis P. Burgard
Kenneth R. Cameron, Jr.
Michael R. Drummond
Henry L. Kitchin, Jr.
Michael B. Shivar
Maurice R. Smith
H. Carlton Fisher
C. Phillip Marion, Jr.
Wendy F. Murphy

Agnes R. Beane
Wilma W. Daniels
Gidget Kidd
Christopher J. Leonard
Ronald B. McNeill
Henry E. Miller III

Daniel McCord, Student Government Association President


The University

Catalogue Change: 1/19/16

General Administration

President Thomas W. Ross — President of the University Dr. Junius Gonzales — Interim President of the University

Catalogue Change: 11/5/15

General Administration

President Thomas W. Ross — President of the University
Mr. Leslie Boney III — Vice President for International, Community and Economic Development
Dr. Christopher S. Brown — Vice President for Research and Graduate Education
Mr. Kenneth Craig — Project Management Officer    Mrs. Lynne Sanders — Vice President for Compliance and Audit Services
Dr. Alisa Chapman — Vice President for Academic Planning and University Programs
Ms. Ann Lemmon  — Secretary of the University
Mr. Thomas C. Shanahan  — Vice President and General Counsel Senior Vice President and General Counsel
Mr. William A. Fleming Mr. Matthew Brody — Vice President for Human Resources and University Benefits Officer
Mr. Timothy Minor — Associate Vice President for Advancement
Mr. Brent Herron — Associate Vice President for Campus Safety and Emergency Operations
Mr. John Leydon — Vice President for Information Resources
Dr. Karrie Dixon — Senior Associate Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs Success
Dr. Warwick A. Arden — Interim    Dr. Junius Gonzales — Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs
Mr. Charles E. Perusse — Chief Operating Officer  Senior Vice President and Cheif Operating Officer
Mrs. Kimrey Rhinehardt — Vice President for Federal Relations
Mr. Matthew Z. Rascoff — Vice President for Technology-Based Learning & Innovation
Mr. Kevin FitzGerald — Chief of Staff Senior Vice President and Chief of Staff
Mr. Andrew “Drew” Moretz — Vice President for Government Relations
Mrs. Joni B. Worthington — Vice President for Communications and Special Assistant to the President

Board of Governors

John C. Fennebresque, Chair
W. Louis Bissette, Jr., Vice Chair
Joan Templeton Perry, Secretary

Class of 2015

W. Louis Bissette Jr.
John C. Fennebresque
Thomas J. Harrelson
James L. Holmes, Jr.
G. Leroy Lail
Mary Ann Maxwell

W. Edwin McMahan
Hari H. Nath
David M. Powers
Richard Taylor
Raiford Trask III
Phillip D. Walker

Class of 2019

W. Louis W. Bissette, Jr.
Pearl Burris-Floyd
C. Philip Byers
Walter C. Davenport
Thom Goolsby
H. Frank Grainger
James L. Holmes, Jr.
Joe Knott, III

Mary Ann Maxwell
J. Alex Mitchell
Anna S. Nelson
David M. Powers
O. Temple Sloan
William A. Webb
Michael L. Williford

 

 

Emeritus Members

Hannah D. Gage
Peter D. Hans

Ex-Officio Member

Alex J. Parker Zach H. King


Equal Opportunity, Diversity, and Unlawful Harassment

Catalogue Change 5/9/16:

Reaffirmation of Commitment to Equal Opportunity

The University of North Carolina Wilmington is committed to and will provide equality of educational and employment opportunity for all persons regardless of race, sex (such as gender, marital status, and pregnancy), age, color, national origin (including ethnicity), creed, religion, disability, sexual orientation, political affiliation, veteran status or relationship to other university constituents—except where sex, age, or ability represent bona fide educational or occupational qualifications or where marital status is a statutorily established eligibility criterion for state-funded employee benefit programs.

The University of North Carolina Wilmington is committed to and will provide equality of educational and employment opportunity for all persons regardless of race, gender, gender identity, sex (such as marital status or pregnancy), age, color, national origin (including ethnicity), religion, disability, sexual orientation, genetic information, political affiliation, veteran status or relationship to other university constituents—except where a protected status represents a bona fide educational or occupational qualification or where marital status is a statutorily established eligibility criterion for state-funded employee benefit programs.


Expenses

Catalogue Change 10/9/2015:

Counted Credit Hours:

The undergraduate credit hours to be counted for this requirement include: (1) all regular session degree-creditable courses taken at UNCW, including repeated courses, failed courses, withdrawals, and those dropped after the last date to add a course; and (2) transfer credit hours accepted from other UNC institutions, North Carolina community colleges, and private and out-of-state colleges and universities. However, this calculation excludes the following credit hours: (1) those earned through the College Board’s Advanced Placement (AP) and College Level Examination Program (CLEP) or similar programs; (2) those earned through institutional advanced placement, course validation, or any similar procedure for awarding course credit; and (3) those earned through the summer session or degree-credit extension division at UNCW or at another UNC institution. ; and (4) transfer credit from private North Carolina institutions, out-of-state and international institutions.


Scholarships and Financial Aid (OSFA)

Cataloge Change 10/20/2015:

Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) for Financial Aid Eligibility

2. Quantitative Measure Defined: (Hours Earned Compared to Hours Attempted)

  • To earn hours at UNCW, one must receive a grade of A, B, C, or D (including “+” or “-“). All other grades, including F, I, W, WE, WF, WP, Z or AU do not earn hours.
  • Classes from which a student withdraws after the drop/add period count as attempted but not earned hours. Therefore, withdrawing from classes after the drop/add period negatively affects students’ ability to satisfy the hours earned standard. (Also see Policy on Return of Title IV Funds)
  • Financial aid recipients should report grade changes to the OSFA in order to reassess financial aid eligibility.
  • When students repeat a course, the total attempted hours increase with each repeat, but the student may only earn hours for each successfully completed course once. Therefore, repeating courses may negatively affect students’ ability to meet the SAP standard and complete 67 75 percent of attempted hours. (Also see Repeating Courses using Financial Aid).
  • Audited hours (AU) do not count toward graduation and students may not receive financial aid for audited courses.
  • Accepted transfer credit counts as both attempted and earned hours, BUT are only used to calculate maximum timeframe to complete the student’s program/degree.

3.The quantitative measure for all students can be summarized as the total number of credit hours successfully completed divided by the total number of credit hours actually attempted. This includes grades of A, B, C, D, F, I, IP, W, WE, WF, NR, Z and P.

Students must complete 67 percent of all attempted hours, including transfer hours.

It is recommended students attempt to earn at least 31 hours per academic year in order to graduate in four years.


University Regulations

Catalogue Correction 1/28/16:

Auditing

The auditing of courses without credit is approved by special permission of the Office of the Registrar and of the instructor involved. Individuals not regularly enrolled as students in the university who wish to audit courses will be classified as special students and will be required to pay regular tuition and fees. Auditing by special students is restricted to classroom-based courses only. No distance education or computer-based courses may be audited by special students. These individuals must complete all registration and any other administrative processes in person at the Office of the Registrar. University students with regular status will be permitted to audit courses and must pay the same tuition and fees required for credit courses. See also Repeating of Courses.


Catalogue Correction 12/22/15:

Insufficient Academic Progress

An undergraduate is automatically placed on academic warning, if the undergraduate does not meet Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP).

  • Satisfactory academic progress is generally defined as completing 67% of all attempted hours (excluding transfer hours) towards the completion of his or her degree program.  This is determined by dividing the number of credit hours successfully completed, defined as having earned a D- or better, by the total number of credit hours actually attempted.
  • When a student is placed on Insurfficient Academic Progress, it is the responsibility of the student to arrange regular meetings with his or her academic advisor or department chair/director to consider specific academic intervention strategies.

Students should refer to the Scholarship and Financial Aid (OSFA) section related to Policy on Return of Title IV Funds for information about how academic warning impacts financial aid eligibility.

Academic Probation

An undergraduate is automatically placed on academic probation when the cumulative GPA drops below 2.0. or if the undergraduate does not meet the standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP).

  • Students who fall within the academic probation category at the end of any semester will be limited to enrolling in no more than 14 hours in the following semester.
  • Satisfactory academic progress is generally defined as completing 67% of all attempted hours (excluding transfer hours) towards the completion of his or her degree program. This is determined by dividing the number of credit hours successfully completed, defined as having earned a D- or better, by the total number of credit hours actually attempted.
  • When a student is placed on academic probation, it is the responsibility of the student to arrange regular meetings with his or her academic advisor or department chair/director to consider specific academic intervention strategies.

Students should refer to the Scholarship and Financial Aid (OSFA) section related to Policy on Return of Title IV Funds for information about how academic probation impacts financial aid eligibility.


Catalogue Correction 8/31/15:

Residency Requirement:

To qualify for the bachelor’s degree, students must be enrolled in a degree program at UNCW and must have completed: (1) a minimum of 25 percent of the credit hours required for graduation through courses offered at UNCW and (2) 15 semester hours at the 300-400 level in the major at the 300-400 level. Exceptions to requirement (2) may be made only with the approval of the department chair or school director, and the appropriate dean. Requirement (1) may not be waived.


Degree Requirements

Catalogue Change: 8/25/16

B.S. Computer Science

Business: ACG 201, ACG 203; ECN 221, ECN 222; FIN 335; MGT 350; MKT 340.
(To correct inadvertent omission of MGR 350 from concentration.)


Catalogue Change 6/9/16:

Studio Art Minor

No more than 3 hours of ART 491 or 3 hours of ART 498 may be counted towards the minor. Courses counted toward a major in art history (i.e. ART 101, ART 102) cannot be counted toward completion of minor requirements. Six additional hours of studio art courses may be chosen to fulfill minor requirements for art history majors. A grade of “C” (2.00) or better is required for each course counted toward the minor.

Courses taken toward a major cannot be counted toward a minor and vice versa.


Catalogue Change 5/19/16 to correct an omission

Requirements for Elementary Education, B.A.

Added: EDN 423 - Second Language Acquisition to English as a Second Language concentration


Catalogue Change 5/5/16:

Requirements for a Major in Criminology, B.A.

Option 3. Public Criminology:

Add: SOC 360 - Social Theory as requirement for the option
Delete: 3 hours from social science electives (list of courses)
 

Catalogue Change 8/20/15:

Requirements for a Major in Criminology, B.A.

Core requirements:

CRM 495 - Senior Seminar  or
CRM 496 - Practicum in Public Sociology/Criminology  (SOC 496) or
CRM 499 - Honors Work in Criminal Justice


Catalogue Change 1/26/16:

Requirements for Criminology Minor

Added to electives:

SOC 256 - Criminology: Writing Intensive


Security Studies Minor

Catalogue Change 2/10/16:

Security Studies Electives (9 hours): (12 hours):


Watson College of Education

Catalogue Change 9/8/15:

Students wishing to pursue teacher preparation programs must be formally admitted to the Watson College of Education and to the Teacher Education Program.  Students in all programs should consult their advisors for admission procedures and for a list of courses requiring Watson College admissions. A grade of “C-” or better is required in educations courses, as well as all courses in the interdisciplinary specialty and the professional semester.  Students may repeat courses in which they earn a grade lower than a “C-” only with the permission of the dean of the Watson College of Education.  A cumulative grade point average of 2.70 is required for the practicum semester. Requirements for admission are:

Completion of the university requirements in English, mathematics and a science laboratory course with a grade of “C-” or better in each course.
Completion of introductory educational foundations coursework (i.e., EDN 200 and EDNL 200 with a grade of “C-” or better.
Completion of 45 or more college credit hours with a minimum overall grade point average of 2.70 on a 4.00 scale on work attempted at UNCW. Transfer students must earn a 2.70 on a minimum of 9 hours completed at UNCW.
Passing scores on teacher education entry tests specified and mandated by the Board of Education of the State of North Carolina.

For students pursuing secondary teacher licensure (grades 9-12) in biology, chemistry, comprehensive science, earth science, English, mathematics, or social studies, admission is required prior to enrollment in Block 1 courses (i.e., SEC 200 or higher)* **. Requirements for admission are:

Completion of the university requirements in English, mathematics and a science laboratory course with a grade of “C-” or better in each course.
Completion of four semesters of full-time college study or the equivalent of junior status with a minimum overall grade point average of 2.70 on a 4.00 scale on work attempted at UNCW. Transfer students must earn a 2.70 on a minimum of 9 hours completed at UNCW.
Passing scores on teacher education entry tests specified and mandated by the Board of Education of the State of North Carolina.

 *Secondary students should plan to be admitted to the Watson College of Education in the spring or summer of their sophomore year and begin SEC coursework in the fall of their junior year. Students may only begin the secondary program in the fall semester.

**Transfer students are allowed to take Block 1 SEC courses as part of the “9 hours at UNCW” without being admitted to WCE. To be eligible to enroll in Block 2 courses, students should apply and have met all requirements to be accepted to WCE by the end of the fall semester (December 1).

Students wishing to pursue teacher preparation programs must be formally admitted to the Watson College of Education and to the Teacher Education Program.  Students in all programs and licensure areas should consult their advisors and the Watson College website for admission procedures/guidelines specific to their program area and for a list of courses requiring Watson College admissions. A grade of “C-” or better is required in educations courses, as well as all courses in the interdisciplinary specialty and the professional semester.  Students may repeat courses in which they earn a grade lower than a “C-” only with the permission of the dean of the Watson College of Education.  North Carolina regulations require admission to the teacher education program at least one semester prior to the internship.  Watson College requires a cumulative grade point average of 2.70 for the internship semester. Requirements for admission are:

  1. Completion of the university requirements in English, mathematics and a science laboratory course with a grade of “C-” or better in each course.
  2. Completion of specified introductory educational foundations coursework (as determined by program area) with a grade of “C-” or better.
  3. Completion of 45 or more college credit hours with a minimum overall grade point average of 2.70 on a 4.00 scale on work attempted at UNCW. Transfer students must earn a 2.70 on a minimum of 9 hours completed at UNCW.
  4. Passing scores on teacher education entry tests (or exemption) specified and mandated by the Board of Education of the State of North Carolina.

Applicable changes were made in the wording of the appropriate “Note” sections of program pages for Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, Middle Grades, Special Education (Both AC and GC Tracks), Secondary Education Teacher Licensure and Special Subject Licensure.


Courses

Catalogue change 10/31/16:

Mus106 - Exploring Music

Added Aesthetic, Intrepretive and Literary Perspectives to the University Studies components this course fulfills.


Catalogue change 9/23/16:

Thematic Transdisciplinary Clusters:

This catalogue has been amended per a 2016 UNCW Faculty Senate decision to retroactively remove the Thematic Transdisciplinary Cluster requirement from the University Studies program. Students who wish to complete a cluster may do so, however, completion of a cluster is no longer required. Course description references to Thematic Transdisciplinary Clusters apply to students who choose to complete a cluster.


Course error corrected 4/8/16:

OCN 350 - Advanced Oceanography

Added: “Partially satisfies University Studies IIII: Thematic Transdisciplinary Cluster: Climate Change and Society” to course description and cluster course listing.


Course error corrected 3/29/16:

RTH 384 - Recreation Therapy and Child Life with Hospitalized Children

Prerequisite: RTH 386 RTH 368  or consent of instructor. An overview of practitioners’ roles with children and families in hospitals - includes developmental milestones/issues; healthcare experiences; therapeutic interventions; family-centered care; diagnostic and treatment interventions; pain management; death and dying; interdisciplinary communication.


Course error corrected 11/30/15:

ENG 212 - British Literature Since 1800

A survey of representative British texts of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This course examines selections from an analytical and historical perspective. Partially satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Aesthetic, Interpretive, and Literary Perspectives. Partially satisfies University Studies IV: Building Competencies/Writing Intensive.

SWK 496 - Field Practicum I

Added: “Satisfies University Studies VI: Common Requirements/Capstone Course” to course description and capstone course listing.

SWK 497 - Field Practicum II

Added: “Satisfies University Studies VI: Common Requirements/Capstone Course” to course description and capstone course listing.


Course error corrected 11/19/15:

BIO 458 - Fisheries Biology

Credits: 3

Prerequisite or corequisite: BIO 366, or consent of instructor. An examination of the factors that control the population dynamics of fishes. Introduction to the principles of fisheries science including estimation of population metrics such as age, growth, mortality, and abundance, fish stock assessment, and fishery management strategies. The lab for this course is BIOL 458.

Course errors corrected 11/17/15: (Course descriptions updated)

CLR 310 - Scientific Writing

Credits: 3

Principles and practice with emphasis on critical thinking, brainstorming, outlining, researching, and writing processes.  Writing of such documents as standard operating procedures (SOPs), proposals, short reports, and letters.  Partially satisfies University Studies IV: Building Competencies/Writing Intensive.

Examines principles and practice of scientific writing in clinical research field with emphasis on critical thinking, researching, and writing processes.  Includes writing of such documents as standard operating procedures, proposals, literature reviews, short reports, and letters.  Partially satisfies University Studies IV: Building Competencies/Writing Intensive.

CLR 330 - Fundamentals of Product Development

Credits: 3

Broad view of product development. Process of development from early research, discovery, and formulation to include safety and efficacy requirements.

Broad view of biopharmaceutical product development.  Process of development from early research, discovery, and formulation to include safety and efficacy requirements.  Focuses on steps necessary for marketing approval by regulatory agencies and goals and objectives for each phase of the clinical development process.

CLR 350 - Medical Terminology and Clinical Endpoints

Credits: 3

Introduces the core concepts health assessment to enable students to understand clinical research endpoints. Includes a comprehensive review of medical terminology. Focuses on clinical endpoints used in various therapeutic areas and safety monitoring.

Audio-visual approach to study of medical terminology, body systems, diagnostic procedures, and pharmacology.  Emphasizes word construction, spelling, usage, comprehension, pronunciation, abbreviations.  Applies terminology to clinical study endpoints commonly used to measure safety and efficacy of a biopharmaceutical product.

PBH 497 - Internship in Public Health

Credits: 12 3-12 (Variable credit depending on concentration)

Prerequisites: PBH majors, senior standing and permission of instructor. Supervised internship placement in the community. Applies theory to practical application in public health. Requires a minimum of 480 hours of supervised fieldwork. Satisfies University Studies V: Explorations Beyond the Classroom/Certified Internship Program.

Prerequisites: PBH majors, 2.5 GPA, senior standing and permission of instructor. Supervised internship placement in the community. Applies theory to practical application in public health. Requires a minimum of 120-480 hours of supervised fieldwork, depending on concentration. Satisfies University Studies V: Explorations Beyond the Classroom/Certified Internship Program.


Course errors corrected: 11/16/15: (Restrictive statements were omitted from course descriptions)

CLR 440 - Bioanalytics

Credits: 3

Prerequisite: CLR 301, CLR 330, CLR 350. Restricted to CLR majors and minors. Examines study designs and statistical analyses commonly used in biopharmaceutical clinical trials and post-marketing studies with focus on interpreting descriptive and inferential statistics. Explores techniques such as randomization, blinding, and placebo-control. Reviews industry processes for data analysis. Discusses basic concepts in epidemiology, pharmacoeconomics, psychometrics/patient-reported outcomes. Partially satisfies University Studies IV: Building Competencies/Information Literacy.

NSG 404 - Health Policy

Credits: 3

Corequisite: NSG 403. Prerequisite/Corequisite: NSG 316. Open only for students enrolled in the RN BS option of the B.S. Nursing. A debate-seminar course focusing on social, psychological, cultural, economic, political, legal, and ethical environments which shape health care delivery systems. Advanced nursing practice in primary care is studied relative to inter-professional relationships and leadership in health policy, health care reform, successful models of health delivery, poverty, research, and interdisciplinary health management.


Course error corrected: 11/13/15: (Added two University Studies attributes that were erroneously deleted).

OCN 250

Credits: 3

Examination of the variability of coastal landforms, the varied processes that shape them, and problems brought about by natural and anthropogenic changes along the coast. Focus on barrier island and spit formation, study of beaches, cliffs/platforms, dunes, estuaries and marshes, effects of tectonics, ice and rivers on beaches and coastal morphology. and deltas. Partially satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Scientific Approaches to the Natural World. Partially satisfies University Studies III: Thematic Transdisciplinary Cluster/Climate Change and Society. Satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Living in a Global Society.  Partially satisfies University Studies IV: Building Competencies/Information Literacy.


Course Error Corrected 11/13/15: (University Studies attributes were added to COM 320 and removed from COM 420)

COM 320 - Interpersonal Communication II

Credits: 3

In-depth analyses and discussions of interpersonal communication theories and research as they apply to topics such as developing closeness with others, communication processes in established relationships, and serious challenges in relationships. Theory application and research designs will be critiqued.  Partially satisfies University Studies IV: Building Competencies/Writing Intensive.  Partially satisfies University Studies IV: Building Competencies/Information Literacy.

COM 420 - Critical Issues in Interpersonal Communication II

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: COM 326 or COM 320 and COM 300 or COM 302 or, consent of instructor. A collaborative application of research skills to significant interpersonal relationship issues and contexts. Students will complete projects suitable for presentation at an undergraduate conference. Partially satisfies University Studies IV: Building Competencies/Writing Intensive.  Partially satisfies University Studies IV: Building Competencies/Information Literacy.


Course error corrected 11/5/15:

PAR 225 - Women and Religion

Credits: 3

Images, expectations, and experiences of women in the history of religions. Topics include the importance of gender to the study of religion, women’s real or perceived power (or lack of it) within the major classical traditions, and alternative women’s religious groups and ideas appearing since the 1970s. Partially satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Historical and Philosophical Approaches. Satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Living in Our Diverse Nation. Partially Satisfies University Studies III: Thematic Transdisciplinary Cluster/Evolution Gender and Social Justice.


Course error corrected 11/3/15:

EXS 217 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II

Credits: 3

(PED 217 ) The human nervous, urinary, endocrine, digestive, and reproductive systems as related to health and movement. Partially satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Scientific Approaches to the Natural World. Partially satisfies University Studies III: Thematic Transdisciplinary Cluster/Foundations for Systems Thinking. Partially satisfies University Studies IV: Building Competencies/Writing Intensive, Satisfies University Studies VI: Capstone Course.


Course errors corrected 10/28/2015:

COM 425 - Negotiation

Credits: 3

Prerequisite: COM 223  COM 225 and consent of instructor. Theoretical and practical perspectives of negotiation. Emphasis on negotiating techniques for use in business and interpersonal relationships. Explores differences between integrative and distributive bargaining.


Course errors corrected 10/9/2015:

ENG 380 - Literature for Children

Credits: 3

Prerequisite: ENG 103 or ENG 200 or ENG 201ENG 204 or ENG 205 recommended but not required. An advanced study of critical approaches to children’s literature of various genres. Intended for anyone interested in children’s literature and children’s culture(s) as well as for future teachers. Partially satisfies University Studies III: Thematic Transdisciplinary Cluster/Ancient Thought and Culture Child and Adolescent Studies.


ENG 381 - Literature for Young Adults

Credits: 3

Prerequisite: ENG 103 or ENG 200 or ENG 201ENG 204 or ENG 205 recommended but not required. Advanced examination of literature for adolescents. Intended for anyone interested in adolescent literature and adolescent culture as well as for future teachers. Partially satisfies University Studies III: Thematic Transdisciplinary Cluster/Ancient Thought and Culture Child and Adolescent Studies.


ENG 385 - Multicultural Young Adult Literature

Credits: 3

Prerequisite: ENG 103 or ENG 200 or ENG 201ENG 204 or ENG 205 recommended but not required. Advanced examination of multicultural literature for adolescents. Satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Living in Our Diverse Nation. Partially satisfies University Studies III: Thematic Transdisciplinary Cluster/Ancient Thought and Culture Child and Adolescent Studies.


Course errors corrected 11/15/2015: (Added Public Health and Human Development to Thematic Transdisciplinary Clusters)

SOC 433 - Sociology of Mental Illness

Credits: 3

Prerequisite: SOC 105. Sociological theories of and social responses to mental illness. History and analysis of mental health systems. Partially satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Understanding Human Institutions and Behaviors. Partially satisfies University Studies III: Thematic Transdisciplinary Cluster/Human Behavior and Thematic Transdisciplinary Cluster/Public Health and Human Development. 


Faculty

Catalogue change 11/20/15:

Gregg A. Buck, assistant professor of theatre, B.A., Shippensburg University; M.F.A., University of Maryland

Scott D. Nice, assistant professor of theatre, B.A., Western Michigan University; M.F.A., Northern Illinois University

Department of Theatre Arts: Mr. T. Salzman, chair. Dr. A. Berkeley (customized option coordinator), Mr. Buck, Dr. Castagno, Mr. M. Holmes, Mr. Lydy, Mr. Nice, Mr. Sorensen (design and technology option coordinator), Mr. F. Trimble, Dr. R. Root, Dr. Vincent (performance option coordinator), Mr. Wagenseller.
Added: Mr. Bovinick, Mr. Enlow, Mr Marino

Catalogue change 8/7/15:

Jorge L. Figueroa, lecturer in, assistant professor of community health, B.A., University of Central Florida; M.S., Ph.D., The University of Georgia

Catalogue change 8/25/15:

Added: Francisco Brignole, assistant professor, world languages and cultures, B.A., M.A., M.B.A., University of Hawaii at Manoa, HI; Ph.D., The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC

Added: Hannah Priest, Ph.D., The University of Alabama

Added: David Hoot, Ph.D., University of Florida

Catalogue change 11/9/15:

Department of Theatre Arts:  Mr. T. Salzman, chair. Mr. Belser, Dr. A. Berkeley (customized option coordinator), Mr. Buck, Dr. Castagno, Mr. M. Holmes, Mr. Lydy, Mr. Nice, Mr. Sorensen (design and technology option coordinator), Mr. F. Trimble, Dr. R. Root, Dr. Vincent (performance option coordinator), Mr. Wagenseller.